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Welcome to National Defensive Driver Training!
Serving the needs of new drivers since 1997.

TIPS FOR PASSING A ROAD TEST


1ST: TAKE A REPUTABLE DRIVING PROGRAM


When you consider that almost ½ of all untrained drivers who take a G1 exit road test (to get a G2 licence) fail the 1st time compared to those who have taken our program, you will understand just how much of a difference quality training can make.

2nd: UNDERSTAND AND OBEY THE LAWS


This seems obvious enough but unfortunately the reasons I hear while discussing this topic in class lead me to believe that there is a lot of inaccurate information out there. Make sure you are clear on things like right of way at intersections, what all the signs mean and what to do at the traffic lights.

3rd: MAKE SAFE DECISIONS


There is a saying in this business; “If you don’t know (if it’s safe), DON’T GO.”

If you turn into a new road too close to an approaching vehicle, there is a good chance that you’ll get hit. If you lane change in front of someone who is in the other lane close behind, there is chance that you could get hit. When you are thinking “I’m not sure that it’s safe”, wait until you are 100% sure before proceeding.

Always remember that when it comes to safety, being right 99% of the time isn’t good enough. If you make 99 out of 100 left turns safely, the other one could be costly to you and other road users.

4th: BE OBSERVANT AND USE YOUR HEAD


Vision is the first line of defense when it comes to road safety. Properly developed observational habits will help you pass the test and drive safely for years to come. You will need to scan intersections from left to right, check your mirrors and blind spots before turning or lane changing and pay attention for signs. Also keep in mind that your examiner needs to see you looking around so exaggerate it a little by moving your head with your eyes. It is good to practice this before you actually take your test as it may initially distract you.

5th: PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR SPEED


Driving too fast or too slow could lead to marks lost or failure.

6th: SIGNAL ALL INTENTIONS (IF IN DOUBT…AND EACH TIME)


The law requires you to signal whenever you intend to alter your direction. This applies to turns, lane changes, parking and pulling over to or away from a curb. Also signal each time you want to do something new. For example, if you are making two lane changes to move from the right lane to a left turning lane, you should signal each of the two lane changes separately.

7th: GO PREPARED


Practice your skills well. The average new driver needs approximately 40 to 50 hours of experience before being ready to drive alone. Besides driving along, you may be asked to do any of the following: Parallel parking, 2 or 3 point turns, hill parking, forward or backing into a parking space.

Bring your licence and I.D.  No licence = No test (and you may have to pay a penalty fee)

Remember your glasses and/or contact lenses (if it is a restriction on your licence)

Make sure you know your vehicle (As an example: It could rain or snow and you don’t want to be fumbling around looking for wipers or defrosters)

Your vehicle must be “fit”. Before taking you out on the road, an examiner will circle check your vehicle. If any lights are out, the horn is not working, your windshield is damaged, the validation sticker has expired or there are any other noticeable deficiencies in a long lists of vehicle defects, you’re test may be cancelled and you may have to pay a rescheduling fee.

8th: SHOW YOUR EXAMINER THAT YOU DON’T NEED A ‘SITTER’ ANYMORE


Generally speaking, an examiner wants to see someone who demonstrates the ability to identify problems, understand the rules, use good safe judgment and handle the vehicle well. When you are about to do your test, remember these general things and don’t sweat the small stuff. Sometimes when an applicant is nervous, they try to think too much about the details. This can actually distract you and create a bad result. Despite what you may think, the examiner is not “out to get you”. Their job is just to make sure you will be safe sharing the road with others.

9th: TRY TO REMAIN CALM (AND DON’T TELL YOUR FRIENDS)


In general, the more people that know about your test, the more nervous you will be. Try to keep it to yourself until after the test. Sometimes just knowing how many friends you will have to explain things to can create a lot of unneeded tension. There will be plenty of opportunity to spring it on them afterward.

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